Why did they create the Electoral College?

Benedict Papenfuss asked, updated on December 30th, 2021; Topic: electoral college
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Electoral College was created by the framers of the U.S. Constitution as an alternative to electing the president by popular vote or by Congress. ... Several weeks after the general election, electors from each state meet in their state capitals and cast their official vote for president and vice president.

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Any way, which document created the Electoral College?

While the Electoral College was established in the Constitution, the details of the process are governed by Chapter 1 of Title 3, United States Code.

In the same way, why did the Electoral College system breakdown in 1800? Because the Constitution did not distinguish between President and Vice-President in the votes cast by each state's electors in the Electoral College, both Jefferson and his running mate Aaron Burr received 73 votes. ...

Without doubt, what happens if you don't get 270 electoral votes?

A candidate must receive an absolute majority of electoral votes (currently 270) to win the presidency or the vice presidency. If no candidate receives a majority in the election for president or vice president, that election is determined via a contingency procedure established by the 12th Amendment.

How are delegates chosen for the Electoral College?

Choosing each State's electors is a two-part process. First, the political parties in each State choose slates of potential electors sometime before the general election. Second, during the general election, the voters in each State select their State's electors by casting their ballots.

14 Related Questions Answered

Are electoral votes based on popular vote?

Electors then cast the votes that decide who becomes president of the United States. Usually, electoral votes align with the popular vote in an election. But a number of times in our nation's history, the person who took the White House did not receive the most popular votes.

How are Electoral College votes determined?

Electoral votes are allocated among the States based on the Census. Every State is allocated a number of votes equal to the number of senators and representatives in its U.S. Congressional delegation—two votes for its senators in the U.S. Senate plus a number of votes equal to the number of its Congressional districts.

Who oversees the Electoral College?

The FEC has no jurisdiction over the Electoral College. The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the federal agency responsible for coordinating activities of States and Congress regarding the Electoral College vote for President.

Who is the only president to be elected unanimously?

George Washington stood for public office five times, serving two terms in the Virginia House of Burgesses and two terms as President of the United States. He is the only independent to serve as U.S. president and the only person unanimously elected to that office.

Has there ever been an Electoral College tie?

The 1800 election resulted in a tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr. ... In the election of 1836, which made Martin Van Buren president, Kentucky's former Democratic senator Richard M. Johnson fell one electoral vote short of a majority among four vice-presidential candidates.

What happens if President elect dies?

The section also provides that if the president-elect dies before noon on January 20, the vice president–elect becomes president-elect.

What are 3 major flaws in the electoral college?

Three criticisms of the College are made: It is “undemocratic;” It permits the election of a candidate who does not win the most votes; and. Its winner-takes-all approach cancels the votes of the losing candidates in each state.

Which two states split up the electors between candidates?

Under the District Method, a State's electoral votes can be split among two or more candidates, just as a state's congressional delegation can be split among multiple political parties. As of 2008, Nebraska and Maine are the only states using the District Method of distributing electoral votes.

Do all of a states electoral votes go to one candidate?

Electors. Most states require that all electoral votes go to the candidate who receives the plurality in that state. After state election officials certify the popular vote of each state, the winning slate of electors meet in the state capital and cast two ballots—one for Vice President and one for President.

How many electoral votes does Pennsylvania have?

Pennsylvania has 20 electoral votes in the Electoral College.

How does the American voting system work?

During the general election, Americans head to the polls to cast their vote for President. But the tally of those votes (the popular vote) does not determine the winner. Instead, Presidential elections use the Electoral College. To win the election, a candidate must receive a majority of electoral votes.

How many votes does each state get in the Electoral College?

Electoral votes, out of 538, allocated to each state and the District of Columbia for presidential elections held in 2012, 2016 and 2020, based on congressional representation, which depends on population data from the 2010 Census. Every jurisdiction is entitled to at least 3.

Is California a Republican state?

The two major political parties in California that currently have representation in the State Legislature and U.S. Congress are the Democratic Party and the Republican Party.

Who are the electors in California?

Presidential Electors are the 55 individuals from California who are entitled to vote in the Electoral College. The number of electors is based on each state's total representation in Congress: California's two United States Senators and 53 United States Representatives in Congress.